Sources for Ship List 5

Continued from Sources for Ship List 4.

__________________________________________________________

Table 71

1032 – Discovery.

  • HBCA, C.1/267-280, Ship’s Logs, Discovery, 1906–1919; C.3/20, Portledge Books; C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements; Ships Records Finding Aid; “Lovegrove, George Frederick,” Biographical Sheet.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 152.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 322–323.

1033 – Pelican.

1034Mooswa.

  • HBCA, “Spence, George,” Biographical Sheet.
  • Coutts, “Buried on the Bay,” 324.
  • Edmund G. Mack, “Breaking the Ice for the Allies,” The Beaver 18, no. 3 (1938): 24, notes the vessel was wrecked in a storm at York Factory, 1916.

1035Cheshire Cat.

  • HBCA, C.1/241, Ship’s Logs, Cheshire Cat, 1910; C.7/26, Ships’ Miscellaneous Papers, Cheshire Cat, 1910.

1036Sorine.

1037Laddie.

1038Stanley.

  • R.J. Fraser, “Early Canadian Icebreakers,” Arctic 16, no. 1 (March 1963): 4.
  • Friends of Hydrography, “People”, “Capt. S.W. (‘Bob’) Bartlett”, “Capt. Dalton”, “Capt. Irving Brock Miles, (Lieutenant, R.N.)”, “Major Stearns”, “Dr. Marcellinus, M.D.”, “Prof. Louis Vescot King,” and “Captain Frederick Anderson, M.E.I.C,” Canadian Hydrographic Association http://www.canfoh.org/ (accessed 22 May 2007).

1039Chrissie C. Thomey.

1040Earl Grey.

  • Fleming, Canada’s Arctic Outlet, 67–68.
  • Fraser, “Early Canadian Icebreakers,” 2, 6, notes the vessel was purchased by Russia ca. 1914 and renamed in succession  Kanada, III International, and Fedor Litke.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 323.

981 –

1041A.T. Gifford.

1042Active.

  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 151.

1043Discovery.

  • HBCA, C.1/267-280, Ship’s Logs, Discovery, 1906–1919; C.3/20, Portledge Books; C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements; Ships Records Finding Aid.
  • A.R. Williamson, “Voyage of the ‘Discovery’ 1911,” Part II, The Beaver 63, no. 1 (summer 1983): 12.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 152.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 325.

1044Pelican.

1045Daryl & Namauk.

  • Mack, ““H.B.S.S. ‘Pelican’ Ends Historic Career,” 14.
  • John T. Rowland, “Mystery at Eric Cove,” The Beaver 30, no. 3 (December 1950): 6–7, notes the “30-foot yawl” that “depended chiefly upon her motor for propulsion … a heavy-duty kerosene engine of the hot bulb variety.” The vessel was purchased, and sailed, in 1911 from the Grenfell Mission, southern Labrador.
  • See photo, The Beaver 21, no. 3 (December 1941): 55, showing model of the Daryl.

1046Erik.

__________________________________________________________

Table 72

1047 – Beothic.

  • HBCA, C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements.
  • Canadian Senate, Report on the Navigability and Fishery Resources of Hudson Bay and Strait, 13.
  • Williamson, “Voyage of the ‘Discovery’,” Part II, 21, describes the ship as “a sealing vessel, registered and owned in St. John’s Newfoundland.”
  • See ACSP, Official number 127687, which had a registered tonnage of 471, was owned by the Thetis Steamship Company of St. Johns, and sold to Russia in 1916.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 325.

981 –

1048Stella Maris.

1049Minto.

1050Burleigh.

1051Chrissie C. Thomey.

1052Nastapoka.

  • Robert J. Flaherty, “The Belcher Islands of Hudson Bay: Their Discovery and Exploration,” Geographical Review, 5 no. 6 (June 1918): 450.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 326–327.

720 –

1053Active.

  • Flaherty, “Belcher Islands,” 455.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 151.

1054Séduisante.

  • Watson, Dundee Whalers, 128, 147, 150.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 153.

1055 –

1056Nascopie.

  • HBCA, C.3/20, Portledge Books; C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements; “Smith, Arthur Cleveland”, “Mack, George Edmund,” and “Freakley, Norman Edward,” Biographical Sheets.
  • Canadian Senate, Report on the Navigability and Fishery Resources of Hudson Bay and Strait, 39, gives her tonnage as 2,600.
  • Cameron, “Ships of Three Centuries,” 18.
  • Coutts, “Buried on the Bay,” 325.
  • Winsor, Stalwart Men and Sturdy Ships, 54, notes the vessel was used as a sealer from 1912–1915 and 1920–1930.
  • “Nascopie,” ACSP, Vessel Registry, Official Number 129922, indicates the double decked and two masted steamer was built at Newcastle in 1912 for the Nascopie Steamship Company of Newfoundland.
  • Hudson’s Bay Company, website http://www.hbc.com/hbcheritage/history/timeline/hbc/ (accessed 9 May 2007), notes the HBC arranged for the Nascopie to be built in 1911, and together with Job Brothers of St. John’s, Newfoundland, formed the Nascopie Steamship Company Ltd, to own and operate it.
  • “Nascopie,” ACSP, Vessel Registry, Official Number, 129922.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 328–329.

981 –

1057 – Walrus.

  • Robert J. Flaherty, “Two Traverses across Ungava Peninsula, Labrador,” The Geographical Review 6, no. 2 (August 1918): 126.
  • See also Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 327.

1058Minto.

1059Arctic.

  • Finnie, “Farewell Voyages,” 45.
  • Friends of Hydrography, “People”, “Capt. Joseph Couillard”, “John Koenig,” and “W.E.W. Jackson,” Canadian Hydrographic Association.

__________________________________________________________

Table 73

1060 – Chrissie.

1061Active.

  • Flaherty, “Belcher,” 455.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 51, 151.

720 –

1062Nascopie.

1063Pelican.

  • HBCA, C.1/627-631, Ship’s Logs, Pelican, 1906–1913; C.3/20, Portledge Books; C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements; C.1/631–663, Ship’s Logs, Pelican, 1913–1920; “Smith, Arthur Cleveland,” Biographical Sheet.
  • S.S. Pelican,” The Beaver, 215.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 152.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 331, 332.

1064Fort Churchill.

  • Coutts, “Buried on the Bay,” 324, also describes a motorized schooner of this name in the Bay “a few years” after 1910.
  • See also HBCA, “Cadney, Edward Guy (1881–1956) (fl. 1916–1951),” biographical sheet, which indicates a motorized Fort Churchill was sailing James Bay from 1916-1941.

981 –

1065Acadia.

  • Friends of Hydrography, “Ships”; and “People”, “Capt. S.W. (‘Bob’) Bartlett”, “Lloyd C. Prittie”, “H.M. Tweed”, “Alfred Perkins”, “George Robinson”, “E.B. MacColl”, “R.L. Fortier,” and “Captain Frederick Anderson, M.E.I.C,” Canadian Hydrographic Association.

1066Laddie.

  • Flaherty, “Belcher Islands,” 443, describes the vessel as “purchased from Sam Bartlett, the well-known Arctic navigator of Brigus Newfoundland. Captain H. Bartlett was put in command.”
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 333.

1067Erik.

  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 334.

1068A.T.

  • Gifford. Hegarty, Returns of Whaling Vessels, 43.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 152.

1069Alette.

1070Alcazer.

1071Bellaventure.

1072Neophite.

  • Malaher, “Port Nelson and the Hudson Bay Railway.”
  • John Macfie, “Centenary at Severn House 1770,” The Beaver 49, no. 4 (Spring 1970): 47, notes the vessel was lost at the mouth of the Severn River.

1073Kathleen.

1074Sinbad.

__________________________________________________________

Table 74

1075 – Beothic.

1076 – Port Nelson.

1077

1078Cearense.

1079Bonaventure.

1080Nascopie.

  • HBCA, C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements, lists Arthur Cleveland Smith as master from 22 June to 16 October, but he is also listed as master of the Pelican this year; “Smith, Arthur Cleveland,” Biographical Sheet.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 338.

1081Pelican.

  • HBCA, C.3/20, Portledge Books; C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements, lists Arthur Cleveland Smith as master from 12 June to 11 October, but he is also listed as master of the Nascopie this year; “Smith, Arthur Cleveland,” Biographical Sheet.
  • S.S. Pelican,” The Beaver, 215.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 152.

1082Fort York.

  • HBCA, C.7/58; Ships Records Finding Aid, notes “Near Severn she was deliberately run aground to protect ‘life and property’ during hurricane force winds, and declared a total wreck”; “Taylor, Richard Hayward,” Biographical Sheet.
  • Coutts, “Buried on the Bay,” 324, 331.
  • Macfie, “Centenary at Severn House 1770,” 47.

1083Emelia P.

  • A.R.M. Lower, “By River to Albany,” The Beaver (June 1944): 19, supplies a photograph. Lower also claims that in 1914 his canoe with a newly arrived outboard motor attached constituted “the first piece of gasoline transport in that part of the world.”

1084Village Belle.

1085Sheba.

1086Minto.

1087Sharon.

1088

1089

  • LAC, Ships’ Logs, Series. RG42-B-5, R1191-26-7-E.
  • de Trémaudan, Hudson Bay Road, 240.

__________________________________________________________

Table 75

1090Bonaventure.

1091 – Laddie.

  • Flaherty, “Belcher Islands,” 450. Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 333.
  • “Laddie,” ACSP, Vessel Registry, Official Number, 101315, indicates a single decked, two masted schooner of that name was built and owned by merchant Robert Scott, at Fogo, Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland in 1893, registered as a brig, but abandoned at sea in 1899. Yet one year later, a vessel with the same official number, place and year of construction is listed as a schooner owned by merchant Charles Dawe of Bay Roberts, Conception Bay, who was also apparently her builder. She is recorded as broken up in Hudson Bay, 1916.

1092Burleigh.

  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 339.

1093Acadia.

  • Friends of Hydrography, “People”, “Capt. William A. Robson,” and “Captain Frederick Anderson, M.E.I.C,” Canadian Hydrographic Association.

1094Annie E. Geede.

1095George B. Cluett.

  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 338.
  • See also “George B. Cluett,” ACSP, Vessel Registry, Official Number, 141687, for a later vessel of the same name also owned by the International Grenfell Association Ltd, St. John’s, Newfoundland.

1096Active.

  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 151.

720 –

1097

1098Nascopie.

  • HBCA, C.3/20, Portledge Books; C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements; “Mack, George Edmund,” Biographical Sheet.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 332, 341.

1099Nastapoka.

  • Flaherty, “Belcher Islands,” 450.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 333.

981 –

1100George B. Cluett.

  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 335.

1101Bellaventure.

1102Adventure.

  • Canadian Senate, Report on the Navigability and Fishery Resources of Hudson Bay and Strait, 29, 36.
  • Winsor, Stalwart Men and Sturdy Ships, 29, credits the vessel’s design with introducing “another great revolution” in northern ships, averring “she could crush the ice with her own weight.” She was sold to Russia 1915–1916.
  • “Adventure,” ACSP, Vessel Registry, Official Number 121430, notes the single decked, two masted, steam/sail vessel was built in Dundee.

1103Sheba.

1104A.T. Gifford.

  • Hegarty, Returns of Whaling Vessels, 44.
  • Ross, Whaling and Eskimos, 40.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 220.

__________________________________________________________

Table 76

1105 –

1106 – Nascopie.

  • HBCA, C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements; “Mack, George Edmund,” Biographical Sheet.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 342.

1107 – Albert.

  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 343.

1108 – Bargany.

1109 – Sheba.

1110Durley Chine.

1111Nascopie.

1112Nascopie.

  • HBCA, C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 345–346.

1113Discovery.

  • HBCA, C.1/267-280, Ship’s Logs, Discovery, 1906–1919; C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements; Ships Records Finding Aid; “Mead, George Henry,” Biographical Sheet.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 345–346.

1114Pelican.

1115Nannuk.

  • S.J. Stewart, “Coats Island,” The Beaver 15, no. 3 (December 1935): 38.

1116

  • Fleming, Canada’s Arctic Outlet, 78.

1117Albert.

  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 344.

1118Nascopie.

1119Duncan & Lady Borden.

1120Finback.

__________________________________________________________

Table 77

1121 – Nascopie.

1122 Pelican.

  • HBCA, C.1/627-633, Ships’ Log, Pelican, 1920; C.4/1, Book of Ships’ Movements.
  • Cotter, “Company Sailing Ships,” 33, notes that “in 1920 Pelican had to be beached at Lake Harbour, Baffin Land,” prior to being sold.
  • S.S. Pelican,” Beaver, 215.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 346–347.

1123Fort George & Fort Charles.

1124Lady Byng.

1125Lady Laurier.

1126Northern Messenger.

  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 347–348.

1127Dorothy G. Snow.

  • “Dorothy G. Snow alias Maria Sonya,” Schooners: Workhorses of the Sea, Nova Scotia Archives & Records management online http://www.gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/schooners/archives.asp?ID=59 (accessed 29 October 2007), supplies a photo and describes a “98-ton Bluenose-type vessel built by Joseph McGill at Shelburne in 1911. She was owned by Captain Joseph Snow, was captained by his brother William, and was named for his daughter Dorothy Greeley Snow. She was renamed the Maria Sonya and wrecked near Bermuda in December 1959.”
  • See also Margaret L’Ecuyer,“Hudson’s Bay Company Port Burwell: Post Journals, Port Burwell, Labrador District, 1 June 1921 to 31 December 1921,” 14 August 1921 http://www.pinetreeline.org/photos/resolu/hbc/hbc-1.html (29 October 2007).
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 348.

1128Thetis.

  • Winsor, Stalwart Men and Sturdy Ships, 64, describes a vessel of the same name, construction place and date, and history of residency in Newfoundland. Her captain from 1917–1924 is given as William C. Winsor of Bonivista.
  • “Back From Hudson’s Bay,” The St. John’s Daily News, Saturday, 18 September 1920, lists a ‘Captain Smith’ as master for a voyage, sponsored by Lamson & Hublin of Montreal and Boston, which had lasted four months.
  • “Thetis,” ACSP, Vessel Registry, Official Number 082739.
  • Cooke and Holland, Exploration, 348.

______________________________________________________________

Proof-reading and up-dating will be on-going. I welcome any suggestions for corrections or for additional information (or broken link notifications).

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