Jane Sinclair

Sibling of Captain Colin Robertson Sinclair (see his Family Network page).

m

Peter Rindisbacher, watercolour, “Arrival at the York Fort anchorage in Hudson’s Bay, August 17, 1821, after a voyage of 79 days,” Source: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1988-250-15; copyright expired.

m

1. SINCLAIR, Jane/ ‘Jean’. Born c. 1798 – 1801, Oxford House, Rupert’s Land to William SINCLAIR and Nahoway/ Nehoway/ Nahovway/ Margaret Holden/ Haldane;

• c. 1811 likely met her future husband, James KIRKNESS, when he worked under her father while William SINCLAIR was Chief Factor of the Winnipeg district; possibly married according to the custom of the country at either Oxford House (her father’s headquarters) or at Jack River House where James was posted for the 1815-1816 trade season;

• marriage of c. 1816 sanctioned by clergy on 25 August 1822, Rock Depot, Hayes River (listed mistakenly as “Jessie Sinclair” is some accounts);

• named in her father’s will 1818, as inheriting “Fifty pounds sterling.” Her husband, James Kirkness, was bequeathed “my silver watch and plan gold seal. And it is also my particular wish to leave to him all my wearing apparel includin [sic] shirts stockings neck cloths etc. for his own use and to do with as he may think proper.” James also received one third of “all my crockery ware,” Jane’s two married sisters’ husbands dividing the other two-thirds.

• sailed out of York Roads (off-shore from York Factory), Hudson Bay, aboard the Hudson’s Bay Company [HBC] ship Prince of Wales [I] in September 1822, in company with her husband James KIRKNESS and daughter Amelia, along with Andrew KIRKNESS and his daughter (perhaps named Mary or Catherine), Donald SUTHERLAND and his two youngest children (Isabella who was 2 yrs old and William under age 10), Peter BAIKIE, his wife and two children, Edward SPENCER (travelling without parents), and Jane ROBERTSON (also travelling without parents) [see Patricia A. McCormick, “Lost Women: Native Wives in Orkney and Lewis,” in Recollecting: Lives of Aboriginal Women of the Canadian Northwest and Borderlands (Athabasca University Press, 2010), 73];

• settled on a farm known as Millhouse/ Midhouse, at Velquoy/ Vetquoy, in Sandwick, Orkney—Sandwick being a parish on the west coast of the Orkney mainland (with a name derived from Old Norse  Sandvík = “Sand Bay,” a bay that opens four miles north of Stromness);

m

Sandwick, Orkney Taken across Skaill Bay, this photo shows the home Farm for Skaill House (in HY2318)—with the edge of Skara Brae on the RH edge of the far side of the bay. 40 years ago, the edge of the bay would have been level with the right-most steading – the Atlantic gales have taken the rest. This is looking South.” Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bayofskaill.jpg.

• widowed 6 November 1843.

• 1861 census: Jean Kirkness (age 63, born Hudson Bay), widow and head of household at Midhouse of Kirkness, proprietor of 100 acres, employing 3 labourers: son James (age 28); servant Margaret Taylor (age 25, Agricultural labourer, Dairymaid from Birsay); Magnus Craigie (19, Servant, Ploughman from Birsay) [Orkney Family History Society: 1861 Census for Sandwick in Orkney via Private User].

• Reported in some genealogies to have died in 1861. However, Roland William Saint-Clair, The Saint-Clairs of the Isles: Being a History of the Sea-Kings of Orkney and Their Scottish Successors of the Surname of Sinclair Arranged and Annotated By Roland William Saint-Clair (Auckland, New Zealand, 1898), p. 8, mentions “Jean Sinclair,” born in Hudson’s Bay, who married James Kirkness and had two sons and a daughter. Saint-Clair reports that Jean died at the residence of her daughter, Amelia, “Mrs. Capt. Slater, of Liverpool,” c. 1894. The problem with Saint-Clair’s report is that Amelia apparently no longer lived in Liverpool in 1894, there being some indication that she returned to Orkney c. 1889. A definitive death or burial record might not exist, because they were sparsely kept in many parishes, there being no requirement to record them, in addition to which many records did not survive.

– sp. KIRKNESS, James. Born c. 1774, parentage unknown, probably born of Orcadian parents, but potentially born in Rupert’s Land of an HBC servant (Kirkness was a common name among them) and a woman native to Hudson’s Bay (in which case she might have travelled to Orkney, or her son James might have been sent there for schooling. Unfortunately such scenarios are difficult to document as not all ships’ logs and passenger lists were kept and not all of those that were kept have survived intact).

The surname KIRKNESS derives from the Old Norse place name for a headland in Orkney which translates as ‘the church at the headland’ (Old Norse kirkja = Northern Middle English Kirk = ‘church’, Olde Norse nes= ‘headland’). “The name is recorded quite frequently in Scandinavian documents, reflecting the long domination of the Northern Scottish islands by the Norsemen. … The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Sir Thomas de Kirkness, charter witness, which was dated 1391, register of the Great Seal of Scotland, during the reign of King Robert III of Scotland, 1390 – 1406. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax” (http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Kirkness#ixzz1WFtRFcQP”>);

HBC career beginning 1797, at which time he was listed as ‘of’ Harray, Orkney (which merely means that was his address on enlistment); worked inland from York Factory as a labourer, writer, and trader to 1811; worked as writer and trader in the Winnipeg district (run by Chief Factor William Sinclair, Jane’s father) to 1814; moved back to York Factory 1814-1815; Trader at Jack River House 1815-1816; whereabouts 1817 unknown; 1818-1822 served as Master, York District; retired 1822;

• transcript of the 1841 Census, fo. 2, p. 10, Sandwick, Orkney (accessed 25 September 2004), lists the family of James and Jane/ Jean Kirkness residing at no. 113 “Kirkness”;

m

“Track to Kirkness Rough track, with the buildings at Kirkness beyond,” dated 26 December 2008. Source: Wikimedia Commons, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Track_to_Kirkness_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1113405.jpg.

m

James Kirkness, grave marker, SandwickBurial Stone for James Kirkness.

• Died 6 November 1843 and buried at Harray Churchyard, St. Michael’s Kirk (Presbyterian/ secession/ free church; aka Overborough), Orkney. His burial stone reads:

Erected by Jane Sinclair in memory of her beloved husband James Kirkness, who departed this life Nov. 6, 1843 – 69 years, “Afflictions sore long time I bore, Physicians aids were vain, but God thought fit to call me home and ease me of my pain”.

[Source: Library at Kirkwall, Records of the Harry Churchyard, Old Portion, p. 4, grave 19.]

Another kirk in the vicinity of the Kirkness farm: “St Peter’s Kirk, Sandwick. St Peter’s stands on the north side of the Bay of Skaill. The kirk was built in 1836 on the site of an older one.” Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:St_Peter%27s_Kirk,_Sandwick_-_geograph.org.uk_-_241969.jpg.

2. KIRKNESS, Amelia. Born c. 1819 in Rupert’s Land; baptized  22 August 1822 at Rock Depot (near HBC post Gordon House on the Hayes River below Berwick Falls along a stretch also known as the Hill River), Rupert’s Land [baptismal record housed in the Archives of Manitoba, St. John’s registry of births and marriages];

• September 1822, sailed out of York Factory with her parents aboard the Prince of Wales [I] to Orkney;

• An apparent second baptismal record presents a quandary to some genealogists [see http://www.cursiter.com/txt-exe-files/Kirkness.txt for a baptism 1 October 1826, with an uncertain birth date—which one online source lists as 20 September 1826]. A plausible explanation is, however, possible: the baptism in Rupert’s Land was later registered in Orkney for at least two historically defensible (though not not entirely ‘above-board’) reasons, as outlined below.

1) It is normally considered to be unlikely that an actual second baptism would occur, because the rite of baptism is a sacrament and therefore is not knowingly conferred twice. To avoid the stigma and/ or legal implications of an ‘illegitimate’ Rupert’s Land birth, however, Amelia’s parents might have decided that a physical record of baptism and birth taking place after their official marriage date was important or necessary. Distance (an ocean lay between the two records) and difference between denominations (the first baptism was Anglican, the second Presbyterian) rendered the likelihood remote that the first record would be brought forward by anyone in the Orkneys to challenge the second. Amelia’s status as a legitimate child who could inherit was probably especially concerning to her parents, given that James Kirkness was not a healthy man (as his wife’s testimony inscribed on his tombstone attested), and her father’s intention that she should inherit a portion of his farm property (the inheritance described below). [On the issue of inheritance and legitimacy of fur-trade offspring, see Jennifer S.H. Brown, Strangers in Blood (1980); on land and inheritance in Orkney see Michael Jones, “Udal Law and Contested Histories of Land Tenure and Landscape in Orkney and Shetland,” Latvijas Zinatnu Akademijas Vestus 66, 3 (2012), 111-112.] Amelia apparently adopted the second date of birth as the ‘real’ one (and though possibly Amelia was never aware that that the second date was not her real birth date, she may well have known, as her husband’s record shows that he too shifted his birth date when it suited), Amelia’s second date appearing subsequently in census records (such as in 1841 and 1851).

2) Although there is also a possibility that a first daughter named Amelia died and a second daughter was given the same Christian name, no record has been found of any death of a first Amelia and neither genealogical records for subsequent descendants nor family documents (for example her correspondence with her uncle Colin Sinclair) supply unequivocal support for that hypothesis.

• c. 1843, becomes “proprietrix of the lands or croft known as Millhouse, in Velquoy [sic: Vetquoy], in Sandwick, Orkney … given … by her father, James Kirkness, farmer, Kirkness, Sandwick, as her share in her father’s succession.”

• Married 11 December 1845 at Sandwick, Orkney, at which time she was designated as ‘of Sandwick, Orkney’;

• 1851 census, listed as age 24, “Sailors Wife Farming 16 acres,” Kirkness, living with her sons William (3 yrs old) and James (1 year old), as well as with her brothers James (18 yrs old, an apprentice carpenter) and William (9 yrs old, a scholar);

• c. 1851, let the farm to “crofter or tenant” Robert Esslemont and sailed to the port of Liverpool with her husband—that being his ‘home’ post until his retirement. (Amelia was in the habit of accompanying her husband on his voyages to sea—with their children, of whom eventually there were possibly 9 or 10);

• 1872-1873, listed as landowner of Orkney property, living in Liverpool. [https://books.google.ca/books?id=QSsOAAAAQAAJ&lpg=PA153&ots=px_kM9clvt&dq=james%20kirkness%20sandwick%20orkney&pg=PA155#v=onepage&q&f=false]

• 1881 census, listed as age 54, born 1827, address 188 Upper Warwick Street, East Toxteth Park, Lancashire [described by John Bartholomew, Gazetteer of the British Isles (1887) as a town and parish in south-west Lancashire “wholly within the parl. limits of Liverpool” (i.e. a neighbourhood adjacent to the wharf)];

• 17 August 1888, submitted the “first application for resumption of holding” under the Crofters Holding Act (1886), for the property in the Crofting Parish of Sandwick, County of Orkney. She was identified in the application as the landlord/ propietrix, Mrs. Amelia Sclater, wife of Alexander Sclater, shipmaster, with the postal address of 3 Westmoreland Road, Liscard, by Liverpool. According to the application, she “designed, with the consent and concurrence of her husband,” and desired, “to resume the holding” and to require the current occupant “to surrender the holding … the said farm or croft of Millhouse, in Velquoy, in the parish of Sandwick, at and against the term of Martinmass 1889; and then to leave the said croft void and redd, so that the applicant and her heirs may enter thereto, and peaceably enjoy the same.” The reason given in the application was that “the applicant’s husband who was a shipmaster, had now retired from his seafaring life, and he and his wife do not now require to reside in Liverpool, more especially as their family are all grown up, and, in the circumstances, Mrs and Mr Slater … are desirous to come back to Orkney and live on and cultivate their own farm.”

The application was judged reasonable and Amelia and husband were allowed to return to her farm.

• 1903 inherited one thousand dollars from her uncle, Captain Colin Robertson SINCLAIR;

• Date of death unknown. A death or burial record might not exist, because they were sparsely kept in many parishes, there being no requirement to record them, and then many records have not survived.

– sp. SCLATER, Alexander [Captain]. Born c.1820/1822/1826, Sandwick, Orkney [possibly to William SLATER and Mary WISHART]; baptized 10 November 1822, Sandwick;

• 1841 census lists Alexander SLATER, 15 years old at 164 “Schoolhouse” with adult male (uncle?) William SLATER [born 1793, ‘of’ Trinigarm Sandwick, possibly son of James SLATTER and Robina MUIR], a 45 year old farmer, and adult female (aunt?) Barbara [LEASK] also 45 years old, along with (siblings? cousins?) Helen 20 yrs., Catherine 13 yrs., and William 2 yrs.;

• obtained Ship Master Certificate of Competency no. C [Colonial] 9232;

[Possible reference: Arrived at Grosse Isle, 6th, ship Goliah, [Captain] Slater, Liverpool, 600 passengers-46 deaths, and many of the passengers sick. There were two medical men on board-reports speaking the ship Aroa [Avon]? from Cork for Quebec with passengers, on the 1st instant, at which time there had been 70 deaths, and many more sick. …  Quebec, July 14.—The late arrivals at Grosse Isle, exhibit a frightful degree of mortality. On board the ship Avon, from Cork, there were no less than 136 deaths. The following is a report of the vessels at Grosse Isle yesterday:—
Ship Goliah, Slater, Liverpool, 600 passengers—46 deaths; ship Manchester, Brown, Liverpool, 512 passengers—11 deaths; ship Jessie, Oliver, Cork, 437 passengers—37 deaths; ship Erin’s Queen, Davidson, Liverpool, 517 passengers—50 deaths, 11 of the crew sick, and a number of passengers; ship Avon, Johnston, Cork, 550 passengers—136 deaths, all the crew sick, and the surviving passengers weak and sickly; barque Sarah, Fletcher, Liverpool, 248 passengers—31 deaths; barque Rosana (Roseana), Wilkinson, Cork, 254 passengers—3 deaths; barque Triton, Smith, Liverpool, 483 passengers, very sickly—90 deaths; barque Alert, Laughlan, Waterford, 234 passengers—4 deaths; brig Thistle, Turner, Liverpool, 389 passengers—2 deaths; brig John Jardine, Sampson, Liverpool, 254 passengers—8 deaths; brig Medusa, Woodworth, Cork, 194 passenger—2 deaths; brig Charles Richards, Angus, Sligo, 178 passengers—8 deaths. The total number of deaths at Grosse Isle, up to the 30th June, was 821; on board ships and buried on the island, to July 8th, 715; died at sea, 2559, making a total of 4095 deaths. ]

• 1865 at age 43 listed home port as Liverpool [Atlantic Canada Shipping Project data base, CD, Ships and Seafarers of Atlantic Canada];

Three masted ship and steam tug, Port of Liverpool, 1800s.

• from 1865 to 1869 served as Master of the Golden Light (built 1853, Newcastle, 1 deck, 3 masts, 179 x 34 x 22, gross tonnage 1182, registered official number M [port of Miramachi] 853028, closure 1856 at Liverpool when transferred to a new port and apparently modified (probably after being damaged and written off) to single deck, 3 masted ship, 185 x 38 x 22, gross tonnage 1052, net tonnage 971, registered 1856 under new official number 007035, registered 1859 at Saint John, New Brunswick, by owners with 16 shares each Benjamin Vaughan mariner, Silas Vaughan mariner, William Vaughan mariner, and Alexander Lockhart, merchant, all residing at Saint Martins;

Ship arriving at the Port of Liverpool with a cargo of American cotton, mid-1800s. Source: The Illustrated London News, courtesy Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs, LC-USZ62-64405.

• Monday, 18 December 1865, Master Alexander SLATER, age 43, signed on board  the Golden Light at Liverpool and voyage commenced with an intended crew of 17 (12 of whom were certified sailors), bound for Savannah, Georgia, intended duration 12 months, entered port of Savannah Monday 19 March 1866, departed Monday 14 May 1866, arrived at Liverpool  12 June 1866, voyage terminated Friday 15 June 1866 and crew signed off;

Elizabeth Frances Hale, drawing, “View of Quebec with Part of Lower Town and the Harbour with Levis Opposite,” dated “after 1823.” Source: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1939-252-16V (copyright expired).

• Saturday 30 June 1866, Master Alexander SLATER, age 44, signed on board the Golden Light at Liverpool and voyage commenced with an intended crew of 15 (11 of whom were certified sailors — 4 from the previous voyage), bound for Quebec City, Canada, intended duration 12 months, arrived back at Liverpool Saturday 29 September 1866, voyage terminated 1 October 1866, master stayed with the ship;

View of Savannah from the River, a wood engraving from a drawing by Harry Fenn, published 1872 in Picturesque America, D. Appleton & Company, New York, New York.” Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:View_of_Savannah_from_the_River.jpg.

• Tuesday, 24 December 1867, Master Alexander SLATER, age 45, signed on board the Golden Light at Liverpool and voyage commenced Saturday 28 December 1867 with an intended crew of 17 (12 of whom were certified sailors), bound for Savannah, intended duration 12 months, entered Port of Savannah Friday 21 February 1868, departed Tuesday 14 April 1868, arrived at Liverpool Wednesday 13 May 1868 and crew discharged, terminated voyage Friday 15 May 1868, master stayed with the ship;

Dockside, Liverpool.

• Wednesday, 20 May 1868, Master Alexander SLATER, age 44 [sic], signed on board the Golden Light at Liverpool and voyage commenced Saturday 23 May 1868 with an intended crew of 16 (11 of whom were certified sailors), bound for Quebec City, intended duration 12 months, entered Port of Quebec Tuesday 11 August 1868, departed same day, arrived at Liverpool Tuesday 29 September 1868 and crew discharged, terminated voyage Thursday 1 October 1868;

J. Davidson, lithograph, 19th-century views of the harbour at Mobile, Alabama.

• Wednesday, 28 October 1868, Master Alexander SLATER, age 46, signed on board the Golden Light at Liverpool and voyage commenced Friday 30 October 1868 with an intended crew of 16 (11 of whom were certified sailors, 4 from the previous voyage), bound for Mobile, Alabama, intended duration 12 months, entered Port of Mobile Tuesday 29 December 1868, departed 17 February 1869, arrived at Liverpool Sunday 4 April 1869, crew discharged 6 April 1869, terminated voyage Thursday 8 April 1869, master stayed with the ship;

George Herbert McCord, oil painting, “New York Harbour,” c. 19th-century. Source: Wikimedia Commons http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_McCord_-_New_York_Harbor.jpg.

• Saturday, 10 April 1869, Master Alexander SLATER, age 46, signed on board the Golden Light at Liverpool and voyage commenced Wednesday 14 April 1869 with an intended crew of 15 (11 of whom were certified sailors, 9 from the previous voyage), bound for New York City, intended duration 12 months, ship’s closure and crew discharged 15 May 1869 after loss of the vessel at sea. [There was a ship of the name which ran aground, was struck by ice, and broken apart, somewhere between Miramichi, New Brunswick, and Liverpool, some time before 1871 (see Hawes v. N. E. Ins. Co., 2 Curtis C. C. 229). Other vessels of the same name also suffered disaster.  In 1861 a Golden Light had been lost due to collision at the Port of Liverpool. In 1853 a Boston clipper ship Golden Light had been struck by lightening and burned while voyaging to San Francisco.]

Currier and Ives, print, “Burning of the Clipper Ship ‘Golden Light’.

• from 1870 to at least 1874 Alexander SLATER was Master of the ship Viola, built 1861 Quebec, 1 deck, 3 masts, 187 x 35 x 21, gross tonnage 1134, net tonnage 1055, official no. 042735, registered 1862 at Glasgow, registered 1870 at St. John New Brunswick to owners Benjamin Vaughan, shipowner, residence Liverpool, listed as the builder with 32 shares, and William Vaughan of the same occupation and residence, also builder with 32 shares, voyages managed by Simon Vaughn, afterwards registry closed 1883 at Liverpool when transferred to a new port;

Port of Glasgow, c. 1841.

• Monday, 5 December 1870, Master Alexander SLATER, age 48, signed on board the Viola at Liverpool and voyage commenced Wednesday 7 December 1870 with an intended crew of 16 (10 of whom were certified sailors, 2 from the previous voyage), bound for New York City, intended duration 18 months, entered Port of New York Monday 30 January 1871, departed Monday 27 February 1871, arrived at Port of New Orleans, Louisiana, Monday 30 March 1871, departed 20 April 1871, arrived Liverpool Monday 29 May 1871, crew discharged same day, terminated voyage Tuesday 30 May 1871, master stayed with the ship;

Port of New Orleans, c. 1870.

• Tuesday, 21 June 1871, Master Alexander SLATER, age 48, signed on board the Viola at Liverpool and voyage commenced Wednesday 28 June 1871 with an intended crew of 18 (12 of whom were certified sailors, 1 from the previous voyage), bound for Havana, West Indies, intended duration 24 months, “the description of the voyage was extremely wide and gave the ship leave to go almost anywhere in the world,” entered Port of Cardiff, Wales, Monday 10 July 1871, departed Monday 31 July 1871, arrived at Port of Havana, West Indies,Wednesday 27 September 1871, departed Friday 10 November 1871, arrived New Orleans, Louisiana, Monday 20 November 1871, departed Tuesday 16 January 1872, arrived Liverpool Sunday 25 February 1872, crew discharged same day, terminated voyage Wednesday 28 February 1872, master stayed with the ship;

Port of Havana.

• Friday, 15 March 1872, Master Alexander SLATER, age 49, signed on board the Viola at Liverpool and voyage commenced Saturday 16 March 1872 with an intended crew of 18 (12 of whom were certified sailors, 4 from the previous voyage), bound for Rio de Janeiro, intended duration 36 months, “the description of the voyage was extremely wide and gave the ship leave to go almost anywhere in the world,” entered Port of Cardiff, Wales, Wednesday 3 April 1872, entered Port of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday 4 June 1872, departed Friday 12 July 1872, arrived Rangoon [Yangon], Burma, Monday 23 September 1872, departed 16 November 1872; arrived Liverpool Sunday 6 April 1873, crew discharged same day, terminated voyage Wednesday 9 April 1873, master stayed with the ship;

Post card, late 19th century, with view of harbour at Colonial Rangoon [Yangon], on the Irawaddy River Burma.

• Tuesday, 6 May 1873, Master Alexander SLATER, age 50, signed on board the Viola at Port of London and voyage commenced Friday 9 May 1873, with 15 of certified sailors (1 from the previous voyage), bound for Montevideo, intended duration 36 months, “the description of the voyage was extremely wide and gave the ship leave to go almost anywhere in the world,” entered Port of Cardiff, Wales, Sunday 18 May 1873, departed Tuesday 10 June 1873, arrived at Montevideo, Uruguay, Thursday 21 August 1873, departed Thursday 16 October 1873, arrived Moulemein, Burma, Wednesday 28 January 1874, departed Wednesday 15 April 1874, arrived Port of Glasgow Tuesday 29 September 1874, crew discharged same day, terminated voyage Wednesday 30 September 1874, master stayed with the ship (which continued to sail out of Liverpool for the Vaughns until 1883 when it was transferred to a new port);

Montevideo Harbour, Uruguay, 1885. Source: Wikimedia Commons, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cerro_de_Montevideo_desde_la_ciudad._A%C3%B1o_1865.jpg.

• Alexander SLATER’s last, or near to last, command, beginning c. 1875 and continuing to at least 1883, appears to have been “the fine full-rigged ship” Newman Hall (see “Obituary, Captain Charles Graham“), built 1875, St. Martins, 2 decks, 3 masts, 216 x 41 x  24, gross tonnage 1582, net tonnage 1402, registered tonnage 1525, registered 1875 at Port of St. John, New Brunswick, to shipowner Benjamin Vaughn of Liverpool, official no. 072216, official closure year 1877, Liverpool, when transferred to a new port (Liverpool);

“View of St. John City and Harbour. Advertisement for Manchester, Robertson & Allison, Dry Goods Merchants,” dated 1890. Source: Library and Archives Canada (copy right expired) MIKAN 2834404.

• “Marine Intelligene … Foreign Ports, New York Times (18 July 1875) “St. John, N.B., July 16.- Cld. [Cleared for departure] ship Newman Hall, Liverpool”;

• “Marine Intelligence..; CLEARED. ARRIVED. SAILED. MISCELLANEOUS. SPOKEN. BY CABLE.,” New York Times (8 May 1880),  “Newman Hall,’Prlace Umberto, Thomas Owen, all for New-York”;

• 1881 census, listed as age 58, born 1823, Master Mariner, address 188 Upper Warwick Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire.

1881 census, vessel Newman Hall ship in Port, Cheshire, Birkenhead, listed aboard: apprentice John William Acton U 18 M Tarpoley, Cheshire, England; apprentice Edwin Acton U 18 M Hull, England.

• 1883 listed in The Sailors’ Magazine and Seamen’s Friend 55, no. 6 (June 1883): 188, as Captain Alexander Sclater, Newman Hall, Liverpool, having donated ten dollars for “library work.”

•By 1888 had retired.

[Subsequent reference to last ship: Extracts from Register of Deceased Seamen relating to Ireland 1887, Register of Deceased Seamen: out of Port of Liverpool Newman Hall Able Bodied Seaman John Needham age 25 born Arklow, died 1 January 1887 of dysentery discharged from ship before demise at Singapore.]

[Subsequent reference to last ship: “Abstract of Sanitary Reports,” vol 8, no. 24, 16 June 1893: South Atlantic Quarantine (perhaps in the Carolinas, or Florida, but likely Savannah, Georgia), week ended 10 June 1893, British Ship Newman Hall arrived 5 June 1893 from Rio de Janeiro bound for Sapelo held for disinfection, inspected and passed.]

[Subsequent reference to last ship: a ship Newman Hall bound for England from New Brunswick under Captain Albert S. Crawford (with wife) was “found bottom-up” in the North Atlantic late November 1896]

• died 1898.

3. SLATER, William. Born 27 November 1846, Sandwick; baptized 31 January 1847, Sandwick.

3. SLATER, James Kirkness. Born 17 September 1849, Sandwick; baptized 25 November 1849, Sandwick.

• 1881 census, listed as age 31, born 1850, married, commercial clerk in the corn trade, address 24 Hermans Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire

– sp. Frances ‘Fanny’. Born 1851, Lea, Derbyshire, England; 1881 census, listed as age 30, living at same address as husband with two sons.

4. SLATER, Colin W. Born 1871, Liverpool, Lancashire; 1881 census listed as age 3.

4. SLATER, Alexander. Born 1880, Liverpool, Lancashire; 1881 census, listed as age 1.

3. SLATER, Alexander. [possibly born 17 April 1854, (announcement in Ottawa Citizen)] Baptized 9 June 1855, Sandwick;

• 1881 census, listed as age 25, born 1856, unmarried, working as a commercial clerk, address 188 Upper Warwick Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire;

• c. 1903 corn [grain] merchant, Liverpool, England.

– sp. [?]

3. SLATER, John William. Born 16 July 1859, Sandwick, Orkney.

3. SLATER, Nelson Cameron. Born 14 August 1862/ c. 1863; baptized 24 September 1862, Oldham Street Presbyterian, Liverpool, Lancashire, England;

• 1881 census listed as 18 years old, unmarried, working as a commercial clerk for the Friendly Society [Seamans’] (Insurance); 1881 address 188 Upper Warwick Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire.

— sp. [?]

4. SCLATER, Nelson Cameron.

— sp. [?]

3. SLATER, Mary Cameron. Born 11 March 1864 a twin and was said to have been small enough to fit in a milk jug; baptized 2 June 1864 at Oldham Street Presbyterian, Liverpool, Lancashire, England;

• 1881 census, listed as age 17, born 1864 at Liverpool, unmarried, address 188 Toxteth Park, Lancashire;

Mary was fond of saying that in all her life she never saw her entire family together at one time because someone was always out on a voyage. She was raised aboard ship, and was proud of the fact that over the course of her lifetime she came to circumnavigate the globe; “Captain Sclater was accompanied on his voyages by his wife and daughter [Mary Cameron], and during one particular voyage when second officer Graham and Miss Sclater were brought very much together something more than friendship sprang up between them, and shortly after the ship’s return to England the second officer and the captain’s daughter were married” [“Obituary, Captain Charles Graham“]; married 24 October 1888; died 23 February 1934/1936; buried at Rake- Lane Cemetery, Wallasey..

– sp. GRAHAM, Charles [Captain]. Born 15 July 1859, Harrington, Cumberland, England, to ship’s Captain George GRAHAM (born 1833, Scotland, profession 1881 Dock Gateman, residing 10 Hodges Mount, Toxteth Park, Lancashire, 1881; remarried) and Anne Craig[Alice?] (born 1859[?], Hanley, Staffordshire, England); baptized 30 August 1859; brother to John GRAHAM, William GRAHAM, George Hy GRAHAM (born 1863, Harrington, Cumberland, occupation 1881 auctioneer’s clerk, residing with parents), Jacob ‘Jake’ GRAHAM (born 1865 Liverpool, Lancashire, occupation 1881 pawnbroker’s assistant, residing with parents; married ‘Annie’), Andrew ‘Andy’ M. GRAHAM (born 1870, attending school 1881, residing with parents), Allen George GRAHAM (born 1874, 1881 attending school, residing with parents), and Edward GRAHAM (born 1876, 1881 attending school, residing with parents); Henry GRAHAM (went to New Zealand; married and died shortly after).

• 1881 census, listed as age 21, unmarried mariner, living with parents at 10 Hodges Mount, Toxteth Park, Lancashire;

• 1901 census listed as age 41 residing at Wallasey, civil parish Liscard, Cheshire County, Birkenhead district.

see also “Obituary, Captain Charles Graham“;

• died 6 December 1922 Harrington, Derby, England, 63 years old; buried 8 December 1922 at Rake-Lane Cemetery, Wallasey, Cheshire, England.

4. GRAHAM, Douglas. Born c. 17 July 1889, Liscard, Cheshire; married 17 February 1919.

– sp. CLAYTON, ‘Amy’ [Dorothy?].

5. GRAHAM, Charles. Born 21 September 1922.

 sp.

5. GRAHAM, Daphne Mary. Born May 1926.

 sp.

4. GRAHAM, Nina Cameron. Born 11 March 1891 at Wallasey or Liscard, Cheshire County, England; married 12 October 1912, Winnipeg, Manitoba; died 24 March 1974, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

– sp. WALLEY, Cecil Stephen. Born 1890 to Thomas Tomlinson WALLEY (born 7 July 1859, Frankton, Whittington, Shropshire, England; died 27 July 1898, Oswestry [?], Cheshire [?], England) and Martha MINSHULL (born 29 August 1866, England; died 30 September 1946, England); brother to Victor Pedley WALLEY (born 1891), Richard Minshull WALLEY, Thomas ‘Arthur’ WALLEY, and Percival ‘Percy’ WALLEY; served in the Great War and the Second World War; died 1960, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

5. WALLEY, [son].

 sp.

5. WALLEY, Marna.

 sp. TEMPLE, Victor ‘Vic’.

5. WALLEY, Kenneth Richard. Born 20 November 1915, Liverpool, England; taken to Winnipeg MB after the war; grades 1-6 at Riverview School, Wpg. 1921-1927;  moved to Balmoral MB; grades 6-12 at Balmoral High; enjoyed swimming; attended United Church; worked at the Pioneer Gold Mine BC, 1936-1938; as a CPR sleeping car conductor for 2 summers, 1938-1940; salesman, Hudson’s Bay Company, Wpg. MB; 2 years of Science, U of Manitoba; Private, U of Manitoba Training Corp, 1939-1940; 2 years Medical College, University of Manitoba; could read some German; lived at 366 Langside Str. Winnipeg MB, 1941; joined RCAF 20 May 1941; married 14 June 1841, Medicine Hat AB; made Pilot Officer, 11 August 1842; Flying Instructor; flew Tiger Moth, Cessna Crane, Oxford, Mosquito, Blenheim (I, IV, V), Beaufort, Beaufighter (II); reprimanded 16 February 1944, failure to attend parade & AWOL, noted “low ranking [in personnel reports] probably due to recent marriage”; Flight Lieutenant; killed in action 20 October 1944, 410 Squadron — on landing after a patrol, at Amiens/ Glisy, in low cloud and rain — crash site 2 km. out of Corbie, on road to Vaux-sur-Somme, France — subsequent patrols were cancelled due to poor weather conditions; buried plot 8, row G, grave 7, Calais War Cemetery, France.

 sp. WARDROP, Jean Hannah. resided at 126 Handsart Blvd., Tuxedo, Winnipeg MB, 1943.

6. WALLEY, [son].

5. WALLEY, Bruce.

 sp.

5. WALLEY, Keith Minshull.

5. WALLEY, Fiona.

5. WALLEY, [daughter].

 sp. PHILLIPS, Thomas ‘Tom’.

5. WALLEY, Marian Nahoway.

5. WALLEY, [son].

 sp. OWENS, Frances Mae.

5. WALLEY, [daughter].

 sp.

4. GRAHAM, Charles Kingsley. Born c. 4 August 1892, Liscard, Cheshire; residence 1901, Liscard, Cheshire, England; married c. 11 May 1919; drowned c. 1945/January 1947, body never found.

– sp. ANGELL, Evelyn May.

5. GRAHAM, .

 sp.

5. GRAHAM, .

 sp.

5. GRAHAM, .

 sp.

5. GRAHAM, .

 sp.

5. GRAHAM, .

 sp.

4. GRAHAM, Amelia Irene ‘Rene’ Craig. Born 13 July 1894; lived at 11 Sea View, Cemaes Bay, Anglesey, Wales.

4. GRAHAM, Phoebe D. Sinclair. Born 7 January 1896, Liscard, Cheshire; residence 31 March 1901, Liscard Cheshire; married 13 September 1921; died 3 February 1933; buried at Rake Lane Cemetery, Wallasey.

– sp. HINTON, William Edward [Captain].

5. HINTON, Anthony Charles. Born

5. HINTON, Angela.

3. SLATER, (son). Twin of Mary Cameron, born c. 1864; died c. 1864.

3. SLATER, Alfred. The “youngest son” (will of Captain Colin Robertson Sinclair).

• 1881 census, listed as 11 years old, born 1870 at Liverpool, attending school, address 188 Upper Warwick Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire;

2. KIRKNESS, James W. Born c. 1832 [16 September 1832?]; baptized either 21 October 1832 Sandwick, Orkney, or, 1841, Sandwick, Orkney [see http://www.cursiter.com/txt-exe-files/Kirkness.txt];

[given the birth-dates of his children, unlikely to be the James KIRKNESS of Birsay, Orkney (the parish just north of Sandwick and Harray), who engaged with the HBC from 1864-1889; nor the James KIRKNESS who farmed at Sandwick and died 1892, given his wife’s widowed status by 1881—both of which scenarios were hypothesized by Patricia A. McCormick, “Lost Women: Native Wives in Orkney and Lewis,” in Recollecting: Lives of Aboriginal Women of the Canadian Northwest and Borderlands (Athabasca University Press, 2010), 73-74].

• moved to Liverpool.

• 20 August 1867, served as heir to his deceased father in two thirds of the room and lands of Kirkness;

• 27 September 1867, sasine in his favour registered: “James Kirkness residing in Liverpool, as heir to James Kirkness, formerly in the service of the Hudson’s Bay Company, North America, afterwards in the parish of Harray, subsequently of Kirkness in the parish of Sandwick, his father. Following from a Decreet of Special Service dated 20 August 1867 – two thirds of the room and lands of Kirkness.” [Orkney Library & Archive, 44 Junction Road, Kirkwall, Orkney, Printed Sasine Abridgements for 1867, abridgement number 186, which cites P.R.43.127]

• the inherited property in Sandwick is named ‘Bankhead.’ [http://www.scotlandsplaces.gov.uk/digital-volumes/ordnance-survey-name-books/orkney-os-name-books-1879-1880/orkney-volume-17/94]

• died before 1881.

– sp. WARD, Jane. Listed in 1881 census as widowed head of household, age 36, born 1845 Scotland, address 20 Merlin Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire; daughter of William WARD (age 70) and Jane WARD (age 69) listed in the 1881 census as boarding at the same address; sister to David WARD (age 30) listed in the 1881 census as clerk living at the same address; 1881 census lists as visitors in Jane WARD’s household Fanny WILSON (age 29) and Martha WILSON age 28.

3. KIRKNESS, Jane Sinclair. Baptized 7 March 1869, Oldham Street Presbyterian, Liverpool, Lancashire, England;

• 1881 census, listed as age 12, born 1869 at Liverpool, attending school, address 20 Merlin Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire.

• married September 1887 [a Jane KIRKNESS also married March 1884 to James ANDERSON — see http://freebmd.org.uk/cgi/search.pl]

— sp. BRINDLEY, Richard. Born 1866, Liverpool, Lancashire, to William BRINDLEY and Mary.

4. BRINDLEY, Arthur. Born 1890, Liverpool, Lancashire.

4. BRINDLEY, Jean. Born 1894, Liverpool, Lancashire.

4. BRINDLEY, William. Born 1896, Liverpool, Lanacashire.

4. BRINDLEY, Herbert. Born 1897, Liverpool, Lancashire.

3. KIRKNESS, Elizabeth. Born 1871, Liverpool, Lancashire;

• 1881 census listed as age 10, attending school, address 20 Merlin Street, Lancadhire.

3. KIRKNESS, Amelia Slater. Born 5 January 1873; baptized 26 January 1873, Saint Peter’s, Liverpool, Lancashire, England [record];

• 1881 census, listed as age 8, born 1873 at Liverpool, attending school, address 20 Merlin Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire.

3. KIRKNESS, James. Born 1877, Liverpool, Lancadhire;

• 1881 census, listed as age 4, address 20 Merlin Street, Toxteth Park, Lancashire.

2. KIRKNESS, William. Possibly baptized 12 December 1841 at Sandwick, Orkney;

• the Atlantic Canada Shipping Project [ACSP], Sample Crew Lists, “Kirkness, William,” Ships and Seafarers of Atlantic Canada, CD, Maritime History Archive and the Maritime Studies Research Unit, CD Rom, lists an able bodied seaman of that name, who was identified as ‘of Liverpool,’ aboard the Atlantic King under the command of Thomas Owens. William’s reported age indicates he was born 1843. The possibility that this was Jane Sinclair and James Kirkness’s son is intriguing, but there is no confirmed linkage;

• it is unlikely that he was the William KIRKNESS who engaged with the HBC in 1860 and deserted in 1864, and entirely probable that he was the William KIRKNESS who engaged with the HBC in 1863, “carried official letters on the steamer leaving Liverpool” (his family’s home port), and was described as a nephew of William SINCLAIR Jr. whose “Father & grandfather had long service” with the Company;

• possibly he is the William KIRKNESS who migrated to Red River Settlement (see Genealogy of the First Metis Nation [GFMN] ID no. 1762, although this may have been the individual born 14 September 1836, Kirkwall, Orkney, who arrived ‘in Canada’ 1856 and married a Jane BROWN at Red River Settlement in 1867).

?– sp. BROWN, Jane. Born c. 1838 in Stromness, Orkney (or 1844 [GFMN])

?3. KIRKNESS, William. Born c. 1868 [GFMN]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s