sources pertaining to historiography and historiology

Penelope J. Corfield, “How Historiology defines History: Text of book review published (with minor cuts) in Times Literary Supplement, 21 November 2008, p. 22.,” html version with link to rtf file: http://bit.ly/CceIo.

Peter C. Seixas, Theorizing historical consciousness (University of Toronto Press, 2004). Google Books preview: http://bit.ly/ahMzrV.

Lawrence Stone, The past and the present (Routledge, 1981). Google Books preview: http://bit.ly/7H4lnR.

Changes to the Known of Knowledge

Kate Ravilious, “The writing on the cave wall,” New Scientist online (17 February 2010). [via @HNN Stone Age pictographs get a reinterpretation]

Canadian Historiography:

Jennifer Hamel, “A Brief History of the Writing (and Re-Writing)
of Canadian National History,” MA Thesis (Saskatoon: University of Saskatchewan, 24 July 2009).

Theorizing Staples Theory:

Marjorie Griffin Cohen, “Division of Labour in a Staple-Exporting Economy,” in Foundations: Readings in Pre-Confederation Canadian History, ed. Margaret Conrad and Alvin Finkel (Toronto: Pearson Inc., 2004)[Part IV, Maturing Colonial Societies, 1815-1867, 349-369], pdf via MCohen, Women/Economy & Labour web-page, Simon Fraser University website.

Presenting Findings:

Chris Clarke, “How to write an incendiary blog post,” The Boston Globe online (14 February 2010), found via @writingislife. 

Linda K. Kerber, “Conference Rules: Everything You Need to Know about Presenting a Scholarly Paper in Public,” American Historical Association, Perspectives on History (May 2008).

Linda K. Kerber, “Conference Rules, 2: Everything you need to know about introducing speakers and running a panel discussion,” American Historical Association, Perspectives on History (September 2008).

Linda K. Kerber, “Conference Rules, 3: Everything you need to know about your role as a commentator or a member of the audience,” American Historical Association, Perspectives on History (October 2008).

Barbara E. Lovitts, Making the Implicit Explicit: Creating Performance Expectations for the Dissertation, Amazon review: http://bit.ly/67YY6W hat tip: @cliotropic.

Geoffrey K. Pullum, “50 Years of Stupid Grammar Advice,” The Chronicle of Higher Education (17 April 2009), argues “The Elements of Style does not deserve the enormous esteem in which it is held by American college graduates. Its advice ranges from limp platitudes to inconsistent nonsense. Its enormous influence has not improved American students’ grasp of English grammar; it has significantly degraded it.” Thank you for posting this, @writingislife.

Barbara Y. Welke, and Kenneth Ledford, “Putting Together a Successful Conference Proposal,” pdf directed specifically at ASLH members, but suitable for scholars submitting proposals for any conference. Found via Mary L. Dudziak, Legal History Blog.

Teaching/Learning:

Robert J. Marzano, “When Students Track Their Progress,” Educational Leadership 67, no. 4 (December 2009): 86-87. Hat tip to @usablelearning for retweeting @mcleod.

Harold Pashler, Mark McDaniel, Doug Rohrer, and Robert Bjork, abstract, “Learning Styles: Concepts and Evidence,” Psychological Science in the Public Interest 9, no. 3 (16 Dec 2009): 105-119. [Via @MisterHistory: “Helping debunk the myth of learning styles”.]

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Peter C. Seixas, Theorizing historical consciousness (University of Toronto Press,

2004).

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